Part II: The Italian Constitution at 70

Part II: The Italian Constitution at 70

Francesco Duranti

Editors’ Note: This is the second part of a two-part post to mark the 70th anniversary of the Constitution of Italy.  Part I, published on Wednesday 18 July, contemplated the trajectory of Italy's Constitution since 1948, from inaugurating a new democracy, to delayed implementation and weathering serious challenges .

This also leads to reflections on the problems shown by the Charter over time and its future prospects. 

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Part I: The Italian Constitution at 70

Part I: The Italian Constitution at 70

Francesco Duranti

Editors’ Note: This is the first part of a two-part post to mark the 70th anniversary of the Constitution of Italy.  Part II, to be published on Friday 20 July, will build on Part I by offering reflections on the problems shown by the Constitution over time and its future prospects.

Since January 1, 1948, more than seventy years of the Italian Constitution have passed. In this long period, which began with the birth of the democratic state in Italy, the Italian Constitution…

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'Extraordinary' Justice and an 'Unaccountable' Juristocracy: Reflections on the Kathua Trial and the Supreme Court of India

'Extraordinary' Justice and an 'Unaccountable' Juristocracy: Reflections on the Kathua Trial and the Supreme Court of India

Satya Prasoon

Editors' Note: This post does not formally form part of the recent Blog Symposium on 'Crisis at the Supreme Court of India?'. However, it may be read as a companion piece to the posts in that Symposium. 

On 7 May 2018, the Supreme Court of India transferred a trial for the rape and murder of an 8-year-old girl from Kathua in Jammu and Kashmir to Pathankot in Punjab.

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Evidence from the Netherlands: How Do Populist Parties Act in Parliament?

Evidence from the Netherlands: How Do Populist Parties Act in Parliament?

Simon Otjes & Tom Louwerse

This article was originaly posted on the London School of Economics and Political Science EUROPP Blog on Monday 9 July. You can view the original here.

Do populist parties behave differently from other parties when they enter parliament? Presenting evidence from a study of parties in the Netherlands, Simon Otjes and Tom Louwerse illustrate that both left-wing and right-wing populist parties tend to primarily voice opposition rather than offer policy alternatives.

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Symposium: South Korean Constitutional Change in Comparative Perspective

Symposium: South Korean Constitutional Change in Comparative Perspective

Cheryl Saunders

In 2017, I participated in discussions about the implications of choosing between major and apparently lesser forms of constitutional change. The occasion was the Melbourne Forum 2017: a joint venture between the intergovernmental democracy assistance organisation International IDEA and the Constitution Transformation Network at Melbourne Law School. The Forum brought together more than 20 constitution building practitioners and scholars from across Asia and the Pacific.

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Constitutionalists' Guide to the Populist Challenge: Lessons from Canada

Constitutionalists' Guide to the Populist Challenge: Lessons from Canada

Giuseppe Martinico

If in 2017 the academic community celebrated the Sesquicentennial of the Canadian Confederation, 2018 marks another important anniversary: the twenty years of the seminal reference of the Canadian Supreme Court on secession. On that occasion the Canadian Supreme Court broke a “constitutional taboo”, by treating secession in legal terms.

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